Edwin “Cliff” Mensah received his Masters and Ph.D. in Economics from North Carolina State University (NCSU). He joined the Thomas College of Business & Economics of the University of North Carolina at Pembroke in 2004 as a visiting professor and later as a tenure-track Assistant Professor of Economics in 2005. Cliff’s research interests include applied microeconomics, consumer economics, household choice models, and technology adoption. He has authored and co-authored several articles appearing in conference proceedings and reputable peer-reviewed journal outlets. As a fellow of the Institute for Money, Technology and Financial Inclusion (IMTFI)—UC Irvine, Cliff’s research focuses on the economics of the use of mobile platforms for monetary transactions (emoney) as well as the economic impact of currency modification and money management among Ghana’s ultra-poor. His service to the university and profession is extensive. In addition to serving on several boards and committees, Cliff has served as the Chair of the Department of Economics, Finance and Decision Science, Director of AACSB Accreditation, Interim Associate Dean, and currently serves as the Associate Dean for the Thomas College of Business & Economics.

Edwin “Cliff” Mensah

Edwin “Cliff” Mensah

Associate Dean & Professor of Economics

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Edwin “Cliff” Mensah received his Masters and Ph.D. in Economics from North Carolina State University (NCSU). He joined the Thomas College of Business & Economics of the University of North Carolina at Pembroke in 2004 as a visiting professor and later as a tenure-track Assistant Professor of Economics in 2005.

Cliff’s research interests include applied microeconomics, consumer economics, household choice models, and technology adoption. He has authored and co-authored several articles appearing in conference proceedings and reputable peer-reviewed journal outlets. As a fellow of the Institute for Money, Technology and Financial Inclusion (IMTFI)—UC Irvine, Cliff’s research focuses on the economics of the use of mobile platforms for monetary transactions (emoney) as well as the economic impact of currency modification and money management among Ghana’s ultra-poor.

His service to the university and profession is extensive. In addition to serving on several boards and committees, Cliff has served as the Chair of the Department of Economics, Finance and Decision Science, Director of AACSB Accreditation, Interim Associate Dean, and currently serves as the Associate Dean for the Thomas College of Business & Economics.